Treva Lindsey's new book explores the details of Washington, D.C.'s unique status as a hotbed of cultural and political activism by black women in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Treva Lindsey's new book explores the details of Washington, D.C.'s unique status as a hotbed of cultural and political activism by black women in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Treva Lindsey, a D.C. native and women’s and African American studies scholar, sought to learn more about the black women who shaped her hometown during the late 1800’s and early 1900’s. Her research uncovered a startling lack of documentation of the “foremothers” who lived in the District at a time when long-held gender and racial roles were quickly shifting. The new book, “Colored No More: Reinventing Black Womanhood in Washington D.C.”, seeks to fill in those gaps in knowledge and reveal their stories. Kojo talks with Lindsey about the lives of those women and their lasting impact on our region and the country as a whole.

Guests

  • Treva Lindsey Associate Professor of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, The Ohio State University; Author, "Colored No More: Reinventing Black Womanhood in Washington D.C." (University of Illinois Press); @divafeminist

Colored No More – Excerpt

“Colored No More: Reinventing Black Womanhood in Washington, D.C.” by Treva B. Lindsey. Copyright 2017 by the Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois. Used with permission of the University of Illinois Press.

"Colored No More" by Treva Lindsey by wamu885 on Scribd

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