Carlene Stephens leads a tour in January of "Hear My Voice: Alexander Graham Bell and the Origins of Recorded Sound."

Carlene Stephens leads a tour in January of "Hear My Voice: Alexander Graham Bell and the Origins of Recorded Sound."

Not long after Thomas Edison invented the phonograph, researchers began to put it to use. A new exhibit at the American History Museum explores the early recordings Alexander Graham Bell made at his Volta Lab in D.C. — including one of his own voice. And a new book explains how researchers at the Smithsonian Institution’s Bureau of American Ethnography used the nascent phonograph to record and preserve voices from cultures they believed to be dying. Kojo explores D.C.’s role in these early sound recordings.

Guests

  • Carlene Stephens Curator, "Hear My Voice" Exhibit at the Smithsonian's American History Museum
  • Brian Hochman Professor of English, Georgetown University; Author of "Savage Preservation: The Ethnographic Origins of Modern Media Technology" (University of Minnesota Press, 2014)

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