From the outside, the Fairwood subdivision near Bowie, Maryland appears to be an African-American success story. This decade-old neighborhood is 73 percent black, with a median income of $170,000. But many of the people who live there are deep underwater on their mortgages, part of a legacy of plunging home values and predatory loans that dates back to before the housing bubble popped. Kojo talks with one of the reporters behind a recent Washington Post series on black wealth in Prince George’s County and examines the lingering impact of the housing crisis in the Washington suburbs.

Guests

  • Michael Fletcher Reporter, Washington Post
  • Mary Hunter Director, Housing Counseling Program, Housing Initiative Partnership, Inc.
  • Thomas Shapiro Director, Institute on Assets and Social Policy and Professor of Law and Social Policy, Brandeis University
  • Dorothy Brown Vice Provost for Academic Affairs and Professor of Law, Emory University School of Law

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