The Kojo Nnamdi Show airs Monday through Thursday from noon to 2 p.m. (ET) on WAMU 88.5, the NPR member-station in Washington, D.C. The live two-hour magazine program highlights news, political issues and social trends of the day and includes listener’s calls, emails and tweets.

On Friday, The Politics Hour airs from noon to 1 p.m. (ET) with resident analyst Tom Sherwood. The program connects the dots between events happening in Washington, D.C., and the statehouses in Annapolis, Maryland and Richmond, Virginia.

A longtime D.C. resident, Kojo Nnamdi is a native of Guyana who brings a global perspective and vast knowledge of the region to front page headlines and explores emerging stories before they are news. “Maybe the best interviewer in town,” according to The Washington Post, Kojo has an inviting on-air style that encourages guests and callers to discover new points of view, embrace controversy and spark new ideas. Everyone has a chance to be part of the conversation, and listeners are invited to participate in the show.

The Kojo Nnamdi Show debuted in 1991 as The Derek McGinty Show and was renamed Public Interest when McGinty left the program in January 1998. Nnamdi became host in August 1998 and the name was changed to The Kojo Nnamdi Show in September 2002.

Most Recent Shows

Sea Level Rise And Chesapeake Bay Communities

Tuesday, Jul 28 2015Scientists are warning that communities near the Chesapeake Bay are at risk because rising sea levels. Last week, public officials joined environmentalists to explore how businesses and institutions in Annapolis, including the Naval Academy, could be affected by rising waters and potential floods. Join Kojo as explore what communities are doing to prepare for the potential effects of climate change throughout the Chesapeake watershed.

Obama’s Trip To Africa & Foreign Aid

Tuesday, Jul 28 2015By visiting Africa this month, President Obama is drawing attention to one of the diplomatic tools that most directly shapes America's relationships with other countries: foreign aid and assistance. But now all policy makers at home feel the United States is pursuing the soundest strategy when it comes to providing aid abroad. We explore the issue with the official in charge of the Africa portfolio for the United States Agency for International Development.

African-Americans And The Atomic Bomb

Monday, Jul 27 2015August marks the 70th anniversary of the use of nuclear bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Even before those events, civil rights and anti-colonial activists were linking racial issues to anti-nuclear advocacy. We consider that history of opposition to the bomb from the likes of Bayard Rustin, Paul Robeson and Malcom X and apply that historic context to the recent news of the Iran nuclear deal.