Commute discrimination can hurt Washingtonians who don't live near the center of the District.

Commute discrimination can hurt Washingtonians who don't live near the center of the District.

A recent study discovered employers hiring for low-wage jobs in downtown D.C. are more likely to call back applicants who live nearby, effectively ignoring Washingtonians who live in Southeast and Northeast.

Kojo discusses what leads to “commute discrimination,” and how it sheds light on other issues like affordable housing, transportation deserts and more.

Guests

  • Tanvi Misra Staff writer for CityLab; @Tanvim
  • David Phillips Research Assistant Professor, Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities and the Department of Economics at the University of Notre Dame

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