Pedestrians pass a new mural on Patterson Street in D.C.'s NoMa neighborhood.

Pedestrians pass a new mural on Patterson Street in D.C.'s NoMa neighborhood.

After the Great Recession and during the Obama presidency, millennials flocked to the nation’s capital in droves. Symbolically, the district represented change and idealism. Practically, it was also a hub for jobs. Local leaders welcomed them, marketing the city as a hip home where they could start their careers. But now, for the first time since 2009, more people are leaving the Washington region than arriving ––including millennials. Kojo sits down with researchers to understand why migration to D.C. has slowed, how millennials factor into the current makeup of the city and what it means when they leave.

Guests

  • Dawn Leijon ‎Executive in Residence, The Kogod School of Business at American University
  • Charmaine Runes Research Assistant, Center of Labor, Human Services, and Population at The Urban Institute
  • Jeannette Chapman Deputy Director and Senior Research Associate, Stephen S. Fuller Institute at George Mason University

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