The Washington region is becoming "polycentric".

The Washington region is becoming "polycentric".

Neighborhoods surrounding the core of the Washington region are increasingly resembling the dense urban pockets in the middle of it of the city. Do changing demographics affect how places are built, particularly as more plans for the suburbs revolve around “smart growth” principles? We discuss how rapid growth and public transportation have affected Washington’s suburbs, and what that means for the residents of tomorrow.

Guests

  • Katya Marin Vice President of the East Bethesda Citizens Association.
  • Roger Lewis Architect; Columnist, "Shaping the City," Washington Post; and Professor Emeritus of Architecture, University of Maryland College Park
  • David Diaz President of the Tysons Partnership, @tysonspartners

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