Twenty years ago, block scheduling was extremely popular in public school systems. The idea to halve the number of daily classes and double their lengths was attractive to many teachers for the expanded educational options it offered. But now, the technique is raising local concern for the ways it limits subjects that need daily practice, like music or foreign language. We discuss the debate on block scheduling with a former Fairfax County educator who taught within a block schedule system for two decades and an education columnist who doesn’t see its use in Arlington.

Guests

  • Jay Mathews Education columnist for the Washington Post
  • Lisa Green Former Fairfax County teacher, department chair and International Baccalaureate coordinator

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