Students at Beers Elementary School in Washington, D.C. put finishing touches on a new learning garden created in partnership with the non profit REAL School Gardens.

Students at Beers Elementary School in Washington, D.C. put finishing touches on a new learning garden created in partnership with the non profit REAL School Gardens.

Studies show that kids who are actively involved in growing fruit and vegetables are more likely to eat them. Increasingly, schools nationwide are taking this message to heart with green plots, gardening clubs and harvest sampling days. But in our region, some schools are taking their gardens to the next level with aquaculture operations, retail and farm market sales and even beekeeping. For students, these operations can mean hands-on fun while they learn how fresh, healthy food arrives on their plates. For teachers they’re valuable tools that enhance STEM skills and teach lessons about nutrition and business. Kojo learns about some of the unique school gardening programs in our region, and finds out why going green can invigorate students far beyond the classroom.

Guests

  • April Martin Regional Executive Director, REAL School Gardens
  • Amy Jagodnik Garden Coordinator, Horace Mann Elementary School
  • Jamie Lahy Special Education Teacher, George Mason High School, Falls Church
  • Ian Leach Student, George Mason High School, Falls Church

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