As summer approaches and students leave school, many of them may want to patronize their neighborhood convenience stores and pharmacies. But across the region, stores are posting signs limiting the number of students that can come in the store, or even banning young people outright. The signs are meant to ensure the safety of other customers and the protection of property, but it does damage to the relationship between the business community and potential customers. We discuss the often strained relationship between teenagers and the businesses they visit.

Guests

  • Daniel Okonkwo Executive Director, DC Lawyers for Youth
  • Alex Koroknay-Palicz President, National Youth Rights Association
  • Jeff Lenard Vice President of Strategic Industry Initiatives, National Association of Convenience Stores

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