Steven Powe has lived alone for five years. Before that, he spent over 50 years living with his mother. He is featured in WAMU's report on D.C.'s struggle to incorporate residents with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Steven Powe has lived alone for five years. Before that, he spent over 50 years living with his mother. He is featured in WAMU's report on D.C.'s struggle to incorporate residents with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Forty years after D.C. residents filed a landmark class-action suit demanding better care of the disabled — and a quarter century since the notorious institution known as Forest Haven closed its doors — conditions for the city’s most vulnerable citizens have improved. But for D.C. — now ranked 8th nationally in its service to residents with disabilities– improvements have come with a steep learning curve at the top of city administration, at advocacy organizations, and among those whose lives depend on the city’s support. Kojo explores how far D.C. has come in caring for those with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and what challenges remain.

Guests

  • Laura Nuss Director, Department on Disability Services (DDS)
  • Tina Campanella Chief Executive Officer, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities
  • Martin Austermuhle Producer / Reporter, WAMU.org
  • Steven Powe Self Advocate

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