It’s long been assumed that the Internet is akin to a national broadcast—and that Internet lingo, memes, acronyms and slang subsume Boston accents and California slang. But using the trove of information on Twitter, some researchers now think our online language might in fact reflect regionalisms in real life. A look at how we speak online and off, and the ways one affects the other.

Guests

  • Naomi Baron Professor of linguistics and Executive Director of the Center for Teaching, Research and Learning World Languages and Cultures at American University.
  • Mike Rugnetta Host, PBS Web Series Idea Channel
  • Gretchen McCulloch Editor, "Lexicon Valley" at Slate; Author, "All Things Linguistic" blog

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