A school lunch prepared by D.C. Central Kitchen, one of the school district's food vendors.

A school lunch prepared by D.C. Central Kitchen, one of the school district's food vendors.

Nearly all of large school districts in the United States run food services for students in-house. But D.C. Public Schools, which relies on a contractor, does not. In 2015, a whistleblower flagged waste and abuse by Chartwells, the District’s food services provider. The matter was resolved in a $19.4 million settlement, but the District still gets its school meals from that provider. With that provider’s contract ending this school year, D.C. officials and parents are wondering why the city can’t provide their own meal services. Kojo explores the school district’s challenges today.

Guests

  • Jeffrey Anderson Washington City Paper contributing writer and co-founder of District Dig
  • Cathal Armstrong Owner and Chef, Restaurant Eve (Alexandria, VA); Author, "My Irish Table: Recipes From the Homeland and Restaurant Eve" Founder, Chefs as Parents

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