History

'Neverhome' by Laird Hunt

Monday, Sep 15, 2014 at 1:06 p.m.

Kojo talks to Laird Hunt about the unlikely heroine of his critically acclaimed book "Neverhome," and her odyssey across some of history's grizzliest battlefields.

Star-Spangled Banner Bicentennial

Thursday, Sep 11, 2014 at 1:30 p.m.

To mark the bicentennial of the hand-made flag that flew over Ft. McHenry in Baltimore and the national anthem it inspired, Kojo explores little-known tales of the people and events that produced them.

Roger Lewis: Development and the District

Thursday, Sep 11, 2014 at 12:06 p.m.

While many are enjoying D.C.'s boom, the companies behind the developments are often viewed with distrust. We speak to architect Roger Lewis about developers and their role in shaping a city.

From Black Power to Education Reform with Howard Fuller

Tuesday, Sep 9, 2014 at 1:27 p.m.

Kojo talks with education activist Howard Fuller about a career devoted to equality. We discover how his time spent in the Jim Crow South, his work as a community organizer and his experience in the Pan Africanism movement have influenced his work.

"The Impulse Society"

Monday, Sep 8, 2014 at 1:06 p.m.

Are Americans more driven toward short-term self-gratification than they were a few generations ago? Author Paul Roberts argues that during the past century, American values have shifted - to the point that our society now favors the...

Recording the Capital: A Musical History of D.C. (Rebroadcast)

Monday, Sep 1, 2014 at 1:06 p.m.

The musical history of the Washington area goes deeper than Duke Ellington and Chuck Brown. But much of the music recorded here in the 20th century, from early rock and roll to bluegrass to jazz, was forgotten about long ago. Kojo chats with Jay Bruder, the host of "The Hometown Special" on WAMU's Bluegrass Country, about the recorded musical history of the nation's capital.

The Case for Free Money

Tuesday, Aug 26, 2014 at 1:24 p.m.

The idea of the government giving all citizens enough money to get by seems a bit like socialism, but many libertarian conservatives are getting behind it. A basic income could replace entitlement programs, cut down on poverty rates, and...

Recording the Capital: A Musical History of D.C.

Thursday, Aug 21, 2014 at 1:06 p.m.

The musical history of the Washington area goes deeper than Duke Ellington and Chuck Brown. But much of the music recorded here in the 20th century, from early rock and roll to bluegrass to jazz, was forgotten about long ago. Kojo chats with Jay Bruder, the host of "The Hometown Special" on WAMU's Bluegrass Country, about the recorded musical history of the nation's capital.

75 Years After the Alexandria Library Sit-In

Thursday, Aug 21, 2014 at 12:06 p.m.

In 1939, five young black men walked into Alexandria, Virginia's public library to request they be issued library cards. When borrowing rights were denied on the grounds the facility was for whites only, the men took books from the shelves...

Slave Resistance and the American Revolution

Wednesday, Aug 20, 2014 at 12:29 p.m.

Kojo and University of Houston historian Gerald Horne revisit the years leading up to the American Revolution to find out how slavery in North America and the British colonies influenced—and even motivated—the revolt.

"Citizen Canine" The Evolution of Our Pets

Thursday, Aug 14, 2014 at 1:06 p.m.

Cats and dogs have become such a part of the family fabric that in many households, they're akin to children. "Science" journalist David Grimm joins Kojo to talk about how our connections to pets are changing laws, industries, and lives.

American Fun: Four Centuries of Joyous Revolt

Thursday, Aug 7, 2014 at 12:06 p.m.

From the Boston Tea Party to rock 'n roll, Americans have always taken their fun seriously. A new books reveals the spirit of joyous rebellion going back to the Pilgrims.

DC's Urban Legends

Wednesday, Jul 30, 2014 at 12:06 p.m.

Professional tour guide and author Robert Pohl debunks the truth behind some of the city's most persistent myths.

The Future of Truth: Veteran Investigative Reporter Charles Lewis

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 1:06 p.m.

Veteran investigative reporter Charles Lewis' new book explores the critical role of journalists in taking on the powerful.

Washington's Civil War Sesquicentennial

Monday, Jul 14, 2014 at 12:06 p.m.

A free black woman gave up land she owned to build Fort Stevens, where D.C.'s only Civil War skirmish took place 150 years ago this week. We explore the battle President Lincoln came to watch.

The Kojo Nnamdi Show is produced by member-supported WAMU 88.5 in Washington DC.