Hot days sometimes prompt ominous, color-coded air quality warnings that spending time outside is unhealthy. In most cities, those air quality readings are generalized from pollution measurements taken once or twice a day at a central location. Now new mapping tools and sensors are providing hyper-local, real-time snapshots of the air we breathe. Using satellite data, mobile devices, and the Internet, environmental scientists are pinpointing when and where our environment can be toxic for our health —- both indoors and out. We get a street-level snapshot of air quality in our region, and find out how the science of measuring the air we breathe is changing.

Guests

  • Angel Hsu Assistant Professor, Yale-NUS College and the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies
  • Chet Wayland Director, Air Quality Assessment Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  • Amanda Northcross Assistant Professor, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, George Washington University’s Milken School of Public Health

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