© 2011, Charlotte Raymond Photography for International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI).

© 2011, Charlotte Raymond Photography for International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI).

For years, scientists, administrators and politicians alike have lamented the precipitous decline in U.S. research funding. At the National Institutes of Health — the primary conduit for federal biomedical research funding — the budget for grants has fallen 20 percent since 2004, hitting young scientists hardest. With money tight and competition high, the average age at which a young investigator receives a grant has risen steadily, pushing many young minds out of labs and into the private sector. We talk to leaders in the research and funding fields about the ripple effects of this scientific funding crunch, and explore new ideas about how to boost scientific inquiry, despite the downturn.

Guests

  • Ronald J. Daniels President, Johns Hopkins University
  • Sally Rockey Deputy Director for Extramural Research, National Institutes of Health
  • Rebecca Riggins Assistant Professor of Oncology, Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center

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