Rethinking D.C. School Boundaries

Rethinking D.C. School Boundaries

For the first time in 30 years, the District of Columbia is redrawing its school boundaries and feeder patterns. Kojo explores how school maps could be redrawn and how the process will play out before the changes take effect in the 2015-2016 school year.

For the first time in more than three decades, the District of Columbia is redrawing its school boundaries and feeder patterns, the geographic lines that determine which schools students attend. It's a process being watched closely by thousands of anxious parents, many of whom select homes based on neighborhood schools. Kojo explores how school maps will be redrawn and how the process will play out before the changes take effect in the 2015-2016 school year.

Guests

Abigail Smith

Deputy Mayor for Education, District of Columbia

Sam Chaltain

Writer and education activist; author of "Our School: Searching for Community in the Era of Choice" (Spring 2014)

Evelyn Boyd Simmons

Co-chair of the Education Committee of the Advisory Neighborhood Commission in Ward 2; community leader and parent

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Featured Clip

Abigail Smith, D.C.'s deputy mayor for education, talks about the district's plan to change school boundaries and feeding patterns, slated to start during the 2015-2016 school year. Smith said, under the plan, students will not be moved from schools they're currently attending. "We expect to have some pretty significant grandfathering provisions," Smith said.

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The Kojo Nnamdi Show is produced by member-supported WAMU 88.5 in Washington DC.