The Legacy Of Gallaudet's 'Deaf President Now' Movement

The Legacy Of Gallaudet's 'Deaf President Now' Movement

Twenty-five years after a student protest led to the first deaf president at Gallaudet University and helped spur passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, Kojo explores the legacy of the campus uprising.

Since its founding in the mid-19th century, Gallaudet University has been an academic and cultural hub for the Deaf community. But until 1988, the university never had a deaf president. Twenty-five years ago this week, students launched a protest on the Northeast D.C. campus, dubbed the "Deaf President Now" movement. The protest resulted in the school's first deaf president, and helped spur passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act two years later. Kojo explores the legacy of student protests at Gallaudet.

Guests

Gregory Hlibok

Former Gallaudet University Student Body President and student leader of the Deaf President Now movement in 1988; Chief of the Disability Rights Division in the Bureau of Consumer and Governmental Affairs at the Federal Communications Commission

T. Alan Hurwitz

President, Gallaudet University

Fred Weiner

Interim Assistant Vice President, Gallaudet University; Member, Gallaudet University Class of 1983

Sen. Tom Harkin

D-Iowa; Sponsor of the Americans with Disabilities Act (1990)

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The Kojo Nnamdi Show is produced by member-supported WAMU 88.5 in Washington DC.