She’s in charge of combating crime in one of the most dynamic urban areas in the country. Kojo sits down with D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier to talk about the law enforcement challenges confronting the city and her strategy for curbing crime in the District.

Guests

  • Cathy Lanier Chief, Metropolitan Police Department

Video

Chief Lanier discusses D.C. Councilmember Phil Mendelson’s proposed bill that would make public the identity of juveniles following a second serious offense. “Some of the privacy protection things actually hurt our ability to physically protect children,” Lanier said, acknowledging that juvenile confidentiality is a “very complex issue:”

The “Secure Communities” program, which would have involved the D.C. police department sharing fingerprints of violent offenders arrested in the district with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is on hold, though Chief Lanier was in favor of it. She explains the program and the misconceptions surrounding it:

Chief Lanier explains why the police department pays attention to events in the city like Go-Go concert listings – as pointed out earlier this week by the Washington City Paper:

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