A declaration of “Confederate History Month” sparks a political civil war in Virginia. While recent shootings in the District prove to be divisive in the early phases of municipal races in D.C. Join us for our weekly review of the politics, policies, and personalities of the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia.

Guests

  • Tom Sherwood Resident Analyst; NBC 4 reporter; and Columnist for the Current Newspapers
  • Adrian Fenty Mayor, District of Columbia
  • George Barker Member, Virginia State Senate (D- Dist. 39- Fairfax / Prince William)

Politics Hour Extra###

D.C. Mayor Adrian Fenty answers questions surrounding supposed changes in his personality and attitude toward both the public and city employees. Fenty said when he meets with city residents, he focuses on the things they tell him are important to them – delivering results on issues like fixing schools, keeping crime down, and commercial development:

Resident analyst Tom Sherwood asks Mayor Fenty about ongoing allegations that Fenty’s friends in the contracting business, including Sinclair Skinner (Liberty Engineering & Design) have gotten more than their fair share of city parks and recreation contracts, and that in some instances they were overpaid for little actual work. Sherwood cited an article in this month’s issue of the Hill Rag, which has not yet been posted online but whose allegations Washington City Paper Loose Lips columnist Mike Debonis detailed this week:

Mayor Fenty said that in his opinion, D.C. schools Chancellor Michelle Rhee has made more progress in 3 years than most school districts have made in the past 5 – 10 years. He also called the contract between DCPS and the Washington Teachers’ Union “the most groundbreaking collective bargaining agreement for teachers and student performance ever negotiated.”

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