Authors

Cubed: A Secret History of the Workplace

Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 1:06 p.m.

Like the nature of white-collar work itself, the concept and design of the office has evolved over more than a century, from the counting-houses of nineteenth-century clerks to the cubicles we love to hate. Author Nikil Saval joins us to explore the history of our workspaces.

The Shifting Culture of American Fiction with Chad Harbach

Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 12:30 p.m.

Author Chad Harbach joins us to consider the changing landscape of America's publishing industry.

Glenn Greenwald: State Surveillance And The Snowden Story

Wednesday, May 14, 2014 at 12:06 p.m.

Kojo sits down with investigative journalist Glenn Greenwald to talk about his role in breaking news from documents stolen by whistleblower Edward Snowden. Kojo asks what's next in this groundbreaking story, and learns about the impact Greenwald's reporting has had on journalism and our security.

"Dream City" - Four Decades of Local D.C. History

Monday, May 12, 2014 at 12:06 p.m.

Two decades ago, journalists Tom Sherwood and Harry Jaffe set out to document the short and tumultuous history of local government in the District of Columbia. But today's D.C. is a different place from the one Sherwood and Jaffe wrote about in their 1994 book, "Dream City." They join Kojo in the studio chat about how the city's changed and what remains the same.

"Astonish Me" by Maggie Shipstead

Monday, May 5, 2014 at 1:22 p.m.

"Astonish Me" is a family drama set against the high-stakes and vibrant world of professional ballet during the Cold War. We talk with author Maggie Shipstead about her second novel, writing what you don't know and the value of solitude.

"A Farm Dies Once a Year"

Wednesday, Apr 30, 2014 at 12:20 p.m.

Arlo Crawford grew up on New Morning Farm in Pennsylvania, which has been selling organic vegetables at in the District since the 1970s. The year he was 31, Crawford took a break from his job and returned to the farm for a growing season...

"In The Light Of What We Know" by Zia Haider Rahman

Monday, Apr 21, 2014 at 12:20 p.m.

We talk to Zia Haider Rahman about his debut novel, the ties between geography and literature and his career thus far, which has included time as a banker, international human rights attorney and now author.

John Feinstein: Baseball's Minor Leagues

Tuesday, Apr 15, 2014 at 1:23 p.m.

Sports writer and author John Feinstein explores the long bus rides, low pay and inner struggles of minor league baseball players striving to make the leap to the majors.

New Yorker Cartoon Editor Bob Mankoff

Thursday, Apr 10, 2014 at 1:20 p.m.

The New Yorker's longtime cartoon editor joins us to talk about the serious business of being funny.

The Legacy Of Nuclear Power

Monday, Mar 31, 2014 at 1:32 p.m.

Kojo explores our historical love-hate relationship with the power, potential and peril of nuclear energy.

School Choice In D.C.

Monday, Mar 31, 2014 at 1:06 p.m.

For the 2014-2015 school year, D.C. piloted its first unified school application lottery, incorporating both traditional public schools and public charter schools into a single application process. As parents learn the results of their applications, we explore school choice in D.C.

Joe Dobrow: "Natural Prophets"

Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 1:06 p.m.

Author Joe Dobrow discusses his new book about the entrepreneurs and ideals that shaped today's natural food industry.

P.J. O'Rourke On Baby Boomers, Retirement And Nostalgia

Tuesday, Mar 18, 2014 at 1:06 p.m.

Political satirist, journalist and frequent "Wait, Wait, Don't Tell Me!'" panelist P.J. O'Rourke joins Kojo in studio.

Sylviane Diouf: "Slavery's Exiles"

Monday, Feb 17, 2014 at 1:24 p.m.

They are known as "maroons:" escaped slaves who lived on the margins of settlements throughout the southern U.S. A new book explores how and where they lived, and what day-to-day survival meant for those who fled slavery.

The Enduring Popularity Of Sherlock Holmes

Thursday, Feb 13, 2014 at 12:06 p.m.

A popular BBC series and a lawsuit over whether his stories are in the public domain are drawing attention once again to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of one of literature's most iconic characters: Sherlock Holmes. We consider the enduring appeal of the "canon" of four novels and 56 short stories featuring Holmes and Watson, and the many interpretations they've inspired on page and screen.

The Kojo Nnamdi Show is produced by member-supported WAMU 88.5 in Washington DC.