At center is the "Julius Caesar" bas-relief on the exterior of the Folger Shakespeare Library.

At center is the "Julius Caesar" bas-relief on the exterior of the Folger Shakespeare Library.

Politicians for centuries learned the art of persuasion from classical texts, with a heavy emphasis on Shakespeare’s plays. While we may not hear Shakespeare quoted in Congress very often today, make no mistake: the Bard’s language infuses almost all political oratory, from the Gettysburg Address to today’s the State of the Union. We explore the language of politics.

Guests

  • Brian Lamb Founder and Executive Chairman, C-SPAN; Host, Q&A
  • Christina Bellantoni Editor in Chief, Roll Call
  • Michael Witmore director, Folger Shakespeare Library

Highlights

  • Listen 48:58

    "One of the things we suffer from is a sort of powerpoint politics and discourse," but there's often more value to a live exchange of ideas, saysMichael Whitmore.

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