Chinese New Year Food Traditions

Chinese New Year Food Traditions

The New Year's holiday is among the biggest celebrations in Chinese culture, and it's marked by a number of food traditions.

The New Year, or Spring Festival, is the biggest holiday celebrated in Chinese culture. The celebration begins with the first full moon and lasts 15 days, and involves family meals, fireworks and gifts. Many of the traditional foods eaten at this time of year symbolize good fortune: eating uncut noodles means a long life, and dumplings resembling the shape of ancient Chinese coins suggest prosperity. We explore how the Chinese New Year is celebrated in communities around the world.

Guests

Scott Drewno

Executive Chef, The Source

Corinna Shen

Co-owner of Seven Seas restaurant in Rockville, Md.

Tobie Meyer-Fong

Associate Professor of History at Johns Hopkins University

Sights And Sounds Of Chinese New Year

Thousands of people welcomed the Lunar New Year at the Chinese New Year parade in Washington’s Chinatown on Sunday, Feb. 2. According to the Chinese zodiac, 2014 is the Year of the Horse, symbolizing a capacity for work, independence, intelligence and friendliness. Chinese New Year celebrations traditionally include firecrackers, live musical performances with lion and dragon dancers, and feasts with foods like a whole fish and dumplings.

Filmed, edited and produced by WAMU 88.5 intern Yi Chen.

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The Kojo Nnamdi Show is produced by member-supported WAMU 88.5 in Washington DC.