Tracing Coffee From Ethiopia To D.C.

Tracing Coffee From Ethiopia To D.C.

Few countries are as synonymous with coffee as Ethiopia, whose exports reach consumers all over the world. Fresh from a learning tour of Ethiopia, Kojo explores the links between the coffee American consumers drink and the economic fortunes of the farmers who grow it.

Few countries are as synonymous with coffee as Ethiopia, whose exports reach consumers all over the world. A few years ago, Ethiopia mandated that its coffee farmers sell their crops through a commodity exchange -- a plan designed to help many of the country's low-income farmers fetch better prices on the market. But that plan's come under criticism from some who feel it's ended direct trade for single origin coffee there and diluted the country's brand. Fresh from a learning tour of Ethiopia, Kojo explores the links between the coffee American consumers drink and the economic fortunes of the farmers who grow it.

Guests

Tim Carman

Food Writer, The Washington Post

Ato Tefera Derebew

Agriculture Minister, Ethiopia

Samuel Demisse

Owner, Importer, Keffa Coffee (Towson, Md.)

Joel Finkelstein

Owner, Roaster, Qualia Coffee (Washington, D.C.)

Solomon Edossa

Chief Technical Adviser and Former Chief Information Officer, Ethiopian Commodity Exchange

Related Links

Tracing Ethiopian Coffee Across The Globe

Few countries are as synonymous with coffee as Ethiopia, which is said to be the birthplace of Arabica coffee itself. When the Kojo team visited the country in January, it learned about the commodity exchange system through which the Ethiopian government requires coffee farmers to sell their crops.

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The Kojo Nnamdi Show is produced by member-supported WAMU 88.5 in Washington DC.