DNA And The Future Of Privacy

DNA And The Future Of Privacy

In 26 states, police can collect DNA samples before a suspect is convicted of a crime. Are new DNA applications challenging our ideas of privacy?

In 26 states, police can collect DNA samples from criminal suspects upon arrest -- before they are convicted of a crime. Prosecutors and police say it's a critical tool for cracking cold cases. But the Maryland Court of Appeals recently ruled that such practices violate Fourth Amendment protections against unreasonable search and seizures. We examine the Maryland case, and ask whether new DNA collection and analysis techniques are challenging our expectations of privacy.

Guests

Stephen B. Mercer

Chief Attorney, Forensics Division, Maryland Office of the Public Defender

Jeffrey Rosen

Professor of Law, George Washington University Law School; Legal Affairs Editor, The New Republic

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The Kojo Nnamdi Show is produced by member-supported WAMU 88.5 in Washington DC.