Keeping Kosher in Washington

Keeping Kosher in Washington

The easy part: avoiding cheeseburgers, pork chops, and lobster. The hard part: dining out with friends at a sit down kosher restaurant. We look at what Kosher is, what it isn't, why the rules get more complicated at Passover, and why they matter to anyone who isn't Jewish.

The Washington region is home to America's fifth largest Jewish population. Yet unlike many other major metropolitan regions, Washington has few restaurants catering to those who adhere to strict Kosher dietary laws. As many Jewish families prepare for traditional Passover seders - orchestrated meals replete with detailed traditions and food preparation -- Kojo explores Jewish food culture and kosher options in our region.

Guests

Joan Nathan

Cookbook author, Quiches, Kugels, and Couscous: My Search for Jewish Cooking in France

Michael Medina

owner, The Kosher Kitchen Catering Co. and Distrikt Bistro

Related Links

Recipe

Moroccan Haroset Truffles With Dates, Almonds, and Apples from Quiches, Kugels, and Couscous: My Search for Jewish Cooking in France by Joan Nathan:  
 
1 pound almonds 
1 pound pitted dates
2 apples, peeled, cored, and quartered
1 teaspoon plus 1/2 cup cinnamon for rolling 
1/4 teaspoon dried ginger
 
1. Place the almonds in a food processor with a steel blade and pulse until finely ground. 
2. Add the dates, apple, 1 teaspoon of the cinnamon, and ginger and continue pulsing until the apples form little pieces and the mixture comes together.  You might have to do this in 2 batches.  Cover and refrigerate overnight.
3. The next day, shape the mixture into balls the size of a large marble.  Put about ½ cup of cinnamon in a bowl, and roll the balls in it.  Serve 2 per person.
 
Yield:  About 40 haroset balls, which will serve 20.

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The Kojo Nnamdi Show is produced by member-supported WAMU 88.5 in Washington DC.